CXC

CXC First Paper-Less Exam Returns Excellent Results

BRIDGETOWN, Barbados – Digital Media, offered in May/June 2014 as the first 100 per cent paper-less examination by the Caribbean Examinations Council (CXC) has returned excellent results in its first sitting.

One hundred per cent of the candidates taking Digital Media Units 1 and 2 achieved acceptable grades which are Grades I-V at CAPE.

Of the 68 candidates who registered for Unit 1 of Digital Media in its first sitting, 19 per cent of the candidates for Unit 1 achieved Grade I; 21 per cent of candidates achieved Grade II; 49 per cent achieved Grade III and nine per cent achieved Grade IV.

Nine candidates registered for Digital Media Unit 2. One achieved Grade I; two achieved Grade II and six achieved Grade III.

CXC Digital Media was introduced to schools in September 2013.

Performance Remains Consistent

Overall performance in CAPE remained consistent with 2013. Ninety percent of entries achieved Grades I-V which are the acceptable grades, the same as in 2013. Performance remained the same on 16 Units, improved on 14 Units and declined on 16 Units.

Mathematics and Sciences

There were mixed performances in the Mathematics and Sciences cluster of subjects. Both Units of Applied Mathematics returned identical performance as last year – 89 per cent of entries achieved Grades I-V. In both Units of Applied Mathematics, 27 per cent of entries achieved Grade 1.

For Pure Mathematics Unit 1, performance declined slightly, from 72 per cent in 2013 to 69 per cent this year, while for Pure Mathematics Unit 2, performance improved marginally from 82 per cent in 2013 to 85 per cent this year.

Both Units of Biology saw a dip in performance this year. Eighty-six per cent of entries achieved acceptable grades in Unit 1 this year compared with 90 per cent in 2013. For Unit 2, ninety-one per cent of entries achieved Grades I-V compared with 97 per cent in 2013.

Performance on both Units of Chemistry improved when compared with 2013. There was a slight improvement on Unit 1 with 85 per cent of entries achieving acceptable grades compared with 84 per cent in 2013; while for Unit 2, there was a three per cent improvement in performance this year. Ninety-five percent of entries achieved acceptable grades, compared with 92 per cent in 2013. Both Units of Chemistry recorded a high percentage of Grade Is. Twenty-four per cent of entries achieved Grade I in Unit 1 and 39 per cent of entries achieved similar grades in Unit 2.

There was a three-per cent improvement on performance in Physics Unit 2 this year – 95 per cent of entries achieved acceptable grades compared with 92 per cent in 2013. Performance remained steady on Physics Unit 1 with 93 per cent of entries achieving similar grades in both years.

Humanities

Performance in the humanities cluster of subjects remained mostly steady when compared with performance last year. French Unit 1 saw a slight improvement with 97 per cent achieving Grades I-V compared with 96 per cent last year. For French Unit 2 there was a three-percent decline, from 99 per cent in 2013 to 96 per cent this year.

Both Units of Spanish performed almost identical in both years. Spanish Unit 1, ninety-two per cent of entries achieved acceptable grades compared with 93 in 2013. Similarly 92 per cent of entries for Unit 2 achieved acceptable grades this year compared with 94 per cent in 2013.

Sociology Units 1 and 2 saw slight decline in performance; 85 per cent in Unit 1 compared with 86 per cent last year and 93 per cent in Unit 2 this year compared with 95 per cent last year.

Law Unit 1, had a one-per cent decline, from 85 per cent of acceptable grades last year to 84 per cent this year; while for Law Unit 2, there was a one-per cent improvement – 82 per cent this year compared with 81 per cent last year.

Performance on Literatures in English for both Units in both 2013 and 2014 were identical. In both years 94 per cent of entries achieved acceptable grades for Unit 1 and 96 per cent achieved similar grades for Unit 2.

History Unit 1 recorded a slight improvement in performance when compared with 2013. Seventy-nine per cent of entries achieved Grades I-V this year compared with 76 per cent in 2013. Unit 2 saw a decline of six per cent – 70 per cent of entries achieved acceptable grades compared with 76 per cent in 2013.

Business

Performance in the business cluster of subjects remained fairly consistent with that of 2013 in most Units. Ninety-five per cent of entries for Accounting Unit 1 achieved acceptable grades compared with 96 per cent in 2013. For Accounting Unit 2, seventy-nine per cent achieved compared with 82 per cent last year.

Management of Business Units 1 and 2 saw a one percentage point variation in the performance on both Units in the two years. Eighty-six per cent of entries achieved acceptable grades in Management of Business Unit 1 compared with 87 per cent in 2013; while for Unit 2, ninety-seven per cent achieved acceptable grades this year, one per cent improvement over 2013.

Similarly for Economics Unit 1, there was a one-per cent variation with 82 per cent of entries achieving Grades I-V in 2014 and 83 per cent in 2013. For Economics Unit 2, eighty-five per cent of entries Grades I-V this year compared with 88 per cent in 2013.

Technical and Vocational

In the technical and vocational cluster of subjects, performance was consistent with the exception of Geometrical and Mechanical Engineering Drawing Unit 1 which saw a marked decline in performance this year. Sixty-nine per cent of entries achieved acceptable grades compared with 85 per cent last year. Seventy-nine per cent of entries for Geometrical and Mechanical Engineering Drawing Unit 2 achieved acceptable grades compared with 83 per cent in 2013.

Both Units of Art and Design remained consistent with 100 per cent of entries achieving acceptable grades in both Units in both years.

Food and Nutrition Unit 2 returned similar results with 99 per cent of entries achieving acceptable grades. In Unit 2, ninety-seven per cent achieved acceptable grades in 2014 compared with 99 per cent in 2013.

Seventy-four per cent of entries for Electrical and Electronic Technology Unit 1 achieved acceptable grades compared with 75 per cent in 2013; and for Unit 2, seventy-nine per cent achieved acceptable grades compared with 83 per cent in 2013. No candidate achieved Grade I in this Unit.

Core Subjects

The two core subjects, Communication Studies and Caribbean Studies continue to perform consistently with previous years. This year 96 per cent of entries achieved acceptable grades in Communication Studies 96 compared with 97 per cent in 2013, and for Caribbean Studies 93 per cent of entries achieved acceptable grades compared with 94 per cent in 2013.

Growth

The number of candidates entered for CAPE this year was 29,379 compared with 28,228 in 2013, and increase of 1151 candidates.

Communication Studies continue to lead the subject entries with 15,625 entries this year compared with 14,926 last year. It is followed by Caribbean Studies with 11,941 entries this year, compared with 11,220 in 2013. Sociology Unit 1 with 5,996 entries, Biology Unit 1 with 5681 and Chemistry Unit 1 with 5,447 entries round out the top five largest Unit entries.

Sixty-two per cent of the candidates were females and 38 per cent males.

Just over 42 per cent of the candidates were in the 18-year age group, while 33 per cent were over 19 years and 22 per cent were in the 17-year age group.

For additional information, please contact Cleveland Sam at telephone number (246) 227-1892 or via e-mail at csam@cxc.org.

CXC Going Live with Electronic Marking in 2014

CXC LogoThe Caribbean Examinations Council (CXC) is utilising electronic marking or e-marking for some of its scripts for the 2014 May/June examination sitting.

The Council will be marking 11 papers in seven Caribbean Secondary Education (CSEC) subjects using the e-marking technology provided by the UK-based company RM.

The seven subjects with papers being e-marked this year are Biology, Chemistry, Human and Social Biology, Integrated Science, Physics, Principles of Accounts and Principles of Business.

As part of the preparation for e-marking, 22 Chief Examiners, Assistant Chief Examiners and Team Assistants had their final training session  last week at CXC’s Headquarters in Barbados by CXC and RM to use of the e-marking tool called RM Results. The 22 persons were taken through the steps for the standardisation and script-marking processes using the RM Results e-marking software.

CXC will open the system for markers to commence live e-marking on Friday 20 June and markers who have been trained and who are approved for e-marking will have a four-week window to complete the scripts assigned to them.

“E-marking will help CXC to capture a lot more detailed information than we were able to do with paper-based marking, and improve our analysis of the examinations, down to the level of the questions,” explained Mrs Brendalee Cato, Assistant Registrar – Measurement and Evaluation working on e-marking. “The accuracy of the scoring will improve and the likelihood of errors is significantly reduced since the system automatically calculates scores as the script is being marked,” Mrs Cato added.

In 2013 CXC used the e-marking software to e-mark two subjects: Integrated Science and Physics. These subjects were marked using both the traditional paper-based format along with the e-marking tool as part of the experiment. The result showed a high correlation between the scripts marked face to face and the same scripts marked using e-marking. This provided the confidence for CXC to increase the number of subjects and papers in 2014.

CXC wishes to assure the public that the move to e-marking does not compromise its usual high standard of quality assurance. The e-marking solution enhances some of the quality assurance procedures and will result in more detailed analysis of examination performance.

Caribbean students to benefit from new CXC/Columbus International Cooperation

CXC Registrar Dr Didacus Jules speaking at the signing of the MOU between Columbus Communications and CXC on Thursday, September 5, 2013 at BayHouse Restaurant Antigua & Barbuda (Luanne Isaac Photo)
CXC Registrar Dr Didacus Jules speaking at the signing of the MOU between Columbus Communications and CXC on Thursday, September 5, 2013 at BayHouse Restaurant Antigua & Barbuda (Luanne Isaac Photo)

FREEPORT, THE BAHAMAS – Imagine studying authentic Trinidadian steel pan from the comfort of your living room in Jamaica or learning the history of reggae via a teleclass on your mobile in Japan. This is the world that the Caribbean Examinations Council (CXC) wants to offer in the not too distance future to students across the region with the help of Columbus International (Columbus).

On Thursday, September 5, 2013, CXC signed a Memorandum of Understanding with the telecommunications provider Columbus. This new partnership will see the council benefiting from Columbus’ extensive regional fibre optic and broadband capacity, and utilising its digital television platforms to bring cutting edge classes to students across the Caribbean.

This is the vision that CXC Registrar Dr. Didacus Jules has and which he says is now closer to being a reality because of Columbus. “It is going to push us big time into the digital realm. All of our syllabi will now be online. CXC will be able to offer new generation subjects such as CAPE Music, and CAPE Performing Arts.”

The educator sees the MOU as a symbol of not just a “material alliance but an alliance of ideas.”

Corporate Vice President Sales and Marketing for Columbus Communications Rhea Yaw Ching (right) and General Manager of Columbus Antigua Jamal James (2nd from right) speaks with Visual Art teachers Emile Hill of Pares Secondary School and Nadia Phillips of Ottos Comprehensive School following the launch of CXC's new CAPE Digital Media Syllabus in Antigua. (Luanne Isaac Photo)
Corporate Vice President Sales and Marketing for Columbus Communications Rhea Yaw Ching (right) and General Manager of Columbus Antigua Jamal James (2nd from right) speaks with Visual Art teachers Emile Hill of Pares Secondary School and Nadia Phillips of Ottos Comprehensive School following the launch of CXC’s new CAPE Digital Media Syllabus in Antigua. (Luanne Isaac Photo)

Rhea Yaw Ching, corporate vice president of sales and marketing for Columbus agrees, stating that “Once our network is fully deployed, every single primary and secondary school that our footprint passes, in countries we serve, will receive free Broadband, free educational Cable TV and discounted Telephony services.”

Javeen Tuitt, a 16-year-old recent graduate who now attends the Antigua & Barbuda ICT CADET programme, welcomes the new offerings from CXC. Tuitt, who is presently studying new media with the focus on photography and editing said, courses, such as the new CAPE Digital Media, are a good idea for students who prefer to be more hands on. “It will give them the chance to learn in a way that is more beneficial. When it is more visual they can understand it better than with a teacher standing in the classroom.”

Global changes and the need for Caribbean students to be more competitive and innovative is driving CXC’s push to utilise digital media to deliver more current and value-based courses.

Students will not be the only ones benefiting from this new collaboration with Columbus, Jules shared.

One of the coming initiatives is for the 6000 teachers who mark examination papers annually to be able to do it electronically from home rather than travel to testing centres or to other islands. “It is a logistical challenge each year to move more than 2000 teachers in the span of two weeks across the Caribbean to mark papers. Working with Columbus will allow us to capitalise on their bandwidth access to make this process more cost efficient and seamless,” he explained.

CXC intends to reach out to more stakeholders beyond the various ministries of education. The plan is to utilise Columbus’ capacity to power updated websites with integrated technologies, which will allow the deaf and visually impaired students to be able to access their sites.

“It is extremely rewarding to see how what we offer is translated in the various countries and how young people are transforming their world with our technology,” Yaw Ching said. “We have seen a primary school set up an online radio station. Others have created Wi-Fi zones where lessons are shared on the net, and where teachers create their own teaching aids, using technology. We look forward to seeing what the new generation of courses will bring.”

Media Contact: Solange Bethart, Communications specialist, Columbus, sbethart@columbus.co
Cleveland Sam, CXC Public Information Officer, (246) 227-1892, csam@cxc.org

About Columbus:

Columbus International Inc. is a privately held diversified telecommunications company based in Barbados. The Company provides digital cable television, broadband Internet and digital landline telephony in Trinidad, Jamaica, Barbados, Grenada and Curacao under the brand name FLOW and in St. Lucia, St. Vincent & the Grenadines and Antigua under the brand name Karib Cable. Columbus also provides corporate data and cloud based services under the brand Columbus Business Solutions. Through its wholly owned subsidiary, Columbus Networks, the Company provides capacity and IP services, corporate data solutions and data center hosting throughout 42 countries in the greater Caribbean, Central American and Andean region. Through its fully protected, ringed submarine fiber optic network spanning close to 42,300 km and its 26,400 km terrestrial fibre and coaxial network, Columbus’ 2,400 plus professionals provide advanced telecom services to a diverse residential and corporate client base of over 550,000 customers.Visit www.columbus.com

About CXC:

The Caribbean Examinations Council (CXC) is the leading provider of examinations for secondary schools in the Caribbean; providing a suite of examinations to 16 English-speaking territories and three Dutch-speaking islands. Established in 1972, CXC offered its first examinations for the Caribbean Secondary Education Certificate (CSEC) in 1979. Nineteen years later, in 1998 CXC introduced the Caribbean Advanced Proficiency Examination (CAPE). Over the last five years, CXC introduced the Caribbean Certificate of Secondary Level Competence (CCSLC) and the Caribbean Vocational Qualification (CVQ) to cater to students with a wider range of abilities. In 2012, the Caribbean Primary Exit Assessment (CPEA) was introduced to help pupils transition smoothly from primary to secondary school.

CXC has two operational centres, the Headquarters located in Barbados, which is headed by the Registrar and Western Zone Office located in Jamaica, headed by the Pro Registrar.

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Photo Captions: Corporate Vice President Sales and Marketing for Columbus Communications Rhea Yaw Ching (right) and General Manager of Columbus Antigua Jamal James (2nd from right) speaks with Visual Art teachers Emile Hill of Pares Secondary School and Nadia Phillips of Ottos Comprehensive School following the launch of CXC’s new CAPE Digital Media Syllabus in Antigua.

CXC Registrar Dr Didacus Jules speaking at the signing of the MOU between Columbus Communications and CXC on Thursday, September 5, 2013 at BayHouse Restaurant Antigua & Barbuda

Antigua & Barbuda’s Minister of State for Information and Communications Dr Edmond Mansoor, Columbus Antigua GM Jamal James, Corporate Vice President Sales and Marketing for Columbus Communications Rhea Yaw Ching and CXC Registrar Dr Didacus Jules at the GATE ICT CADET Facility in Antigua.

Antigua Telecoms Minister Lauds Columbus International Inc. and CXC MOU

Antigua & Barbuda’s Minister of State for Information and Communications, Dr. Edmond Mansoor (Laune Isaac Photo)
Antigua & Barbuda’s Minister of State for Information and Communications, Dr. Edmond Mansoor (Laune Isaac Photo)

FREEPORT, THE BAHAMAS – Antigua & Barbuda’s Minister of State for Information and Communications, Dr. Edmond Mansoor, on Thursday, September 05, 2013 lauded the signing of a Memorandum of Understanding between Columbus International Inc. (Columbus) and the Caribbean Examination Council (CXC).

Dr. Mansoor called CXC Registrar, Dr. Didacus Jules, and corporate vice president of sales and marketing for Columbus, Rhea Yaw Ching, change agents at the helm of revolutionising education for all ages across the Caribbean.

“The absolute epicentre of changing Caribbean civilisation, is through education,” the minister stated. “To make this happen,” he added, “We need broadband as an absolute minimum to every household, every student, and every government agency. It is the economic currency of the future. We are very interested as a government in Columbus’ vision of piping fibre to the home.”

The new MOU outlines three key areas that Columbus will support the work of the CXC.

  • To enhance CXC’s technological capacity to help bring needed innovation to the delivery of its education products and services in the Caribbean;
  • To foster the development of indigenous educational content through the use of technology; and
  • To enable broad dissemination of educational content relevant to the Caribbean.

Dr. Jules acknowledged the importance of the occasion, which brings together two organisations with complimentary goals. The collaboration, he noted, would allow for CXC to elevate and privilege Caribbean knowledge adding that Columbus was giving the regional examination body the infrastructure to disseminate indigenous content in a digital space.

Since starting operations in 2005, Columbus is one of the fastest growing companies in the region with USB$1.3 in assets and a capital investment of over USB$1.1. The Company operates one of the most advanced broadband networks in the region, spanning 42 nations with operations in 8 Caribbean countries.

Rhea Yaw Ching said the MOU fits squarely in the company’s vision for the region. “We are making sure that Columbus can create the capacity to enable the creativity.”

Flow-Morning Event-0072
Corporate Vice President of Sales and Marketing for Columbus Communications Rhea Yaw Ching and CXC Registrar Dr. Didacus Jules sign a MOU on Thursday, September 5, 2013. (Laune Isaac Photo)

The Columbus executive acknowledged the work of their strategic partner BrightPath Foundation, which is a key player in the regional push to mobilize young people to embrace technology, not as consumers but as creators of mobile apps, instructional games, movies, and other positive content which reflects the Caribbean experience.

BrightPath, Dr. Jules noted, is providing the hands on expertise to enable the CXC to manifest its vision of providing more educational solutions, which solve real world challenges, and prepares students to operate in a changing and increasingly competitive world.

The CXC Registrar explained that the next step in actualising the MOU would be for an assessment of the capacity of Columbus and CXC. The new alliance will support their access to increased bandwidth, installation of fibre optic wiring in the new headquarters and the establishment of a new eMarking process.

About Columbus:

Columbus International Inc. is a privately held diversified telecommunications company based in Barbados. The Company provides digital cable television, broadband Internet and digital landline telephony in Trinidad, Jamaica, Barbados, Grenada and Curacao under the brand name FLOW and in St. Lucia, St. Vincent & the Grenadines and Antigua under the brand name Karib Cable. Columbus also provides corporate data and cloud based services under the brand Columbus Business Solutions. Through its wholly owned subsidiary, Columbus Networks, the Company provides capacity and IP services, corporate data solutions and data center hosting throughout 42 countries in the greater Caribbean, Central American and Andean region. Through its fully protected, ringed submarine fiber optic network spanning close to 42,300 km and its 26,400 km terrestrial fibre and coaxial network, Columbus’ 2,400 plus professionals provide advanced telecom services to a diverse residential and corporate client base of over 550,000 customers.Visit www.columbus.com

About CXC:

The Caribbean Examinations Council (CXC) is the leading provider of examinations for secondary schools in the Caribbean; providing a suite of examinations to 16 English-speaking territories and three Dutch-speaking islands. Established in 1972, CXC offered its first examinations for the Caribbean Secondary Education Certificate (CSEC) in 1979. Nineteen years later, in 1998 CXC introduced the Caribbean Advanced Proficiency Examination (CAPE). Over the last five years, CXC introduced the Caribbean Certificate of Secondary Level Competence (CCSLC) and the Caribbean Vocational Qualification (CVQ) to cater to students with a wider range of abilities. In 2012, the Caribbean Primary Exit Assessment (CPEA) was introduced to help pupils transition smoothly from primary to secondary school.

CXC has two operational centres, the Headquarters located in Barbados, which is headed by the Registrar and Western Zone Office located in Jamaica, headed by the Pro Registrar.

Media Contact:

Solange Bethart, Communications Specialist, Columbus, sbethart@columbus.co
Cleveland Sam, CXC Public Information Officer, (246) 227-1892, csam@cxc.org

CXC @ 40: Testament to Caribbean Assertiveness

By Dr Didacus Jules, CXC Registrar

2013 marks the 40th Anniversary of the establishment of the Caribbean Examinations Council (CXC) and while the organisation has been promoting the milestone, it is a significant watershed that is insufficiently noted at all levels in the Caribbean. The anniversary is being celebrated under the theme “Celebrating the Accomplishments; Continuing the Journey” and this speaks volumes to the vision that continues to drive this sterling regional organisation.

The move to establish the Caribbean Examinations Council was a bold move in 1973 and a very strong assertion of the confidence of visionary leaders in our capacity to take responsibility for our own destiny. They were not however blind to the considerable challenges that this posed. At the inauguration of CXC, the Right Honourable Errol Barrow spoke to the challenges as well as the self-confidence of that defining moment: “I do not think that anyone imagines that the task of the Caribbean Examinations Council will be an easy one. This body will have to develop and master skills acquired by the Overseas Examinations Bodies after more than a century of trial and error. It will have to break down prejudices which blindly accept the imported as superior to the local product… There is every reason to believe that this new venture in education will also be successful.” Continue reading